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This week I got another chance to dive into the Biology Department warehouse. I’m working on a proposal that would include controlled feeding experiments with copepods. To get accurate andconsistent measurements, it’s important to make sure all the food particles don’t sink to the bottom of the experimental containers. This can be done by slowly…

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The featured image above (when viewed from the blog’s main page) shows a tube with glass beads and homogenized coral tissue. Little bits of coral tissue were added to the tube along with glass beads and a homogenization solution. The tube is mechanically shaken, and the glass beads smash up the tissue, releasing the RNA…

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Peer review is often held up as a “gold standard” for assessing the quality and rigor of scientific publications. Topical experts are asked to scrutinize the work, assess its suitability for publication, and make recommendations for improvement. Two things are a little weird about the process: (1) the reviewers are almost always doing this work…

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I’m posting to highlight our recent publication: Maas AE, Lawson G, Wang ZA, Bergan A, Tarrant AM  (2020). Seasonal variation in physiology and shell condition of the pteropod Limacina retroversa in the Gulf of Maine relative to life cycle and carbonate chemistry. Progress in Oceanography 186: 102371. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pocean.2020.102371 (*If you don’t have access and want…

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It’s still a weird time. Massachusetts is slowly re-opening in the midst of a lot of uncertainty. Here at WHOI, our facilities are still closed, except for a few essential functions. I’ve been briefly coming into the lab twice a week to maintain my Nematostella colony. After I finished one of these recent visits, I…

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Like most other Americans, and many people around the world, I’ve been “sheltering in place” for a couple of weeks now. I’m still getting used to this enormous change…just a few weeks ago, I was struggling to keep up with the hustle and bustle of daily life, and now…well, things look a lot different.  I’m…

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(llustration by Natalie Renier, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution) Lots going on in the lab these days! Cory and I just got back from the 2020 meeting of the Society of Integrative and Comparative Biology. Cory presented a poster describing his work on thermal entrainment of circadian rhythms in Nematostella. The very short version is that…

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Sometimes “sleeping in” is a good idea We all know the value of a good nap. The world keeps spinning, but for a few minutes or hours, you can isolate yourself from all your worries and let your body recharge. Ever wish you could bury your head under the blankets for longer? Plenty of animals…

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We are happy to announce the recent online publication of: Tarrant AM, RR Helm, O Levy, HR Rivera. Environmental entrainment demonstrates natural circadian rhythmicity in the cnidarian Nematostella vectensis. In the Journal of Experimental Biology. jeb.205393 doi: 10.1242/jeb.205393 Published 14 October 2019. The photo shows Rebecca Helm deploying anemones in their native environment. The work…

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Sometimes being a scientist is exciting because we travel to remote destinations or make new discoveries. But sometimes it’s “exciting” for other reasons… This weekend both Cory (JP Student Cory Berger) and I were in the lab, taking care of our Nematostella colony and generally catching up on research. I was kind of grouchy because I had…

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