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August 2022 Newsletter

September 15, 2022

Dear Friends of NOSAMS,

These past few months have been a productive time at NOSAMS and we are writing to update you on recent changes.

We are excited to announce that we have purchased a new MIni CArbon DAting System (MICADAS), manufactured by IonPlus, with funds from a successful NSF MRI proposal and WHOI cost sharing. It was installed in April, 2022 and passed final site acceptance tests in July, 2022. Samples can be introduced as graphite or via the Gas Interface System (GIS) with an Elemental Analyzer for organic samples or with a Carbonate System for inorganic samples. Over the next several months we will be offering these lower cost, lower precision carbonate and ready-to-burn organic carbon analyses using the hybrid gas interface MICADAS peripherals. Please contact us at nosams@whoi.edu for details. Thank you to NSF and the radiocarbon community for their support!

After 7 years of distinguished service, Dr. Mark Kurz has stepped down as NOSAMS Director and Dr. Susan Lang has taken up the post. The staff is very grateful to Mark who helped steer the facility through key staffing changes, the pandemic, and the funding of the MICADAS.

Dr. Susan Lang started as the new NOSAMS Director in May, 2022. She has a strong background using radiocarbon in the areas of dissolved organic carbon and compound specific analyses of small polar molecules. She has a long-standing interest in developing new radiocarbon and stable carbon methods.

As always, please visit our website for more information on all of our current services and fees.

All the best, the NOSAMS Facility Staff

MICADAS

August 23, 2022

We are excited to announce that we have purchased a new MIni CArbon DAting System (MICADAS), manufactured by IonPlus, with funds from a successful NSF MRI proposal and WHOI cost sharing. It was installed in April, 2022 and passed final site acceptance tests in July, 2022. Samples can now be introduced as graphite or via the Gas Interface System (GIS) with an Elemental Analyzer for organic samples or with a Carbonate Handling System for inorganic samples. Over the next several months we will be starting to offer lower cost, lower precision carbonate and ready-to-burn organic carbon analyses using the hybrid gas interface MICADAS peripherals.

Thank you to NSF and the radiocarbon community for their support!

MICADAS, the early days

Staff Recognition

July 30, 2022

Sue Handwork was recently recognized at the WHOI Employee Appreciation Celebration for her 40 years of service, of which 28 have been at NOSAMS. Also recognized were Mark Roberts (20 years), Mary Lardie Gaylord (20 years) and Kalina Gospodinova (10 years). Congratulations and thank you to all of these hard working, long serving NOSAMS staff.

Sue Handwork (right) receiving recognition for her 40 years of service to WHOI. Also pictured are the recent NOSAMS Director Dr. Mark Kurz (left) and current NOSAMS Director Dr. Susan Lang (middle).

New NOSAMS Director – Susan Lang

May 23, 2022

After 7 years of distinguished service, Dr. Mark Kurz has stepped down as NOSAMS Director and Dr. Susan Lang has taken up the post. The staff is very grateful to Mark who helped steer the facility through key staffing changes, the pandemic, and a successful proposal to the NSF Major Research Initiative to fund a new MIni CArbon DAting System (MICADAS), manufactured by IonPlus.

Dr. Susan Lang started as the new NOSAMS Director in May, 2022. She has a strong background using radiocarbon in the areas of dissolved organic carbon and compound specific analyses of small polar molecules. She has a long-standing interest in developing new radiocarbon and stable carbon methods.

USAMS Decommissioned

December 23, 2021

In preparation for the installation of a new AMS system, we had to dismantle the USAMS system in December 2021 after 30 years of operations. We have retained the USAMS hybrid ion source and low energy magnet.

After 30 years of operations, the USAMS system was decommissioned to make room for the new MICADAS system.

 

SNEAP2021

February 23, 2021

NOSAMS is pleased to host the 2021 Symposium of Northeastern Accelerator Personnel (SNEAP). The meeting is May 3-5 and will be virtual.

SNEAP is a community of personnel involved with electrostatic particle accelerators and their use. Founded in 1968, the organization gathers annually to discuss and exchange information to the benefit of all who attend. The topics covered include ion sources, electrostatic and RF accelerators, telemetry and control systems, cryogenic systems, safety issues and many other topics relevant to the operation of small to medium sized electrostatic accelerator laboratories. The meeting format includes submitted papers, laboratory reports, and open discussions.

More information and registration is available on the conference website.

CFAMS panorama

COVID-19 Update 2

July 6, 2020

As COVID-19 cases in Massachusetts have declined, WHOI is beginning it’s phased opening plan.  The institution will be open, but the campuses will still be closed and open only to those that have been approved.

NOSAMS continues to be open and to operate with a partial staff in this new re-opening phase while respecting conservative physical distancing as outlined by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and WHOI policies. We are accepting and processing samples. NOSAMS does not expect an increase in turnaround times as a result of COVID-19. Please send questions or comments to nosams@whoi.edu.

Former NOSAMS graduate student intern publishes work on estimates of permafrost carbon emissions

June 18, 2020
Jenny Bowen, a graduate student from the University of Michigan, was awarded a graduate student internship with NOSAMS last year and worked with NOSAMS researchers, Josh Burton and Li Xu.  Bowen, along with Rose Cory (University of  Michigan) and Colin Ward (WHOI), investigated the radiocarbon age of carbon dioxide produced during the oxidation of permafrost organic carbon by sunlight.

New work from Sophie Hage et al. on Terrestrial OM Preservation in Sediments

June 1, 2020

Sophie Hage is a postgraduate research student studying Sedimentology within Ocean and Earth Science in the National Oceanography Centre at the Southampton at the University of Southampton.  From March to June in 2018 she was a guest student here at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution working with Dr. Valier Galy.  While here at WHOI working with Dr. Galy, she spent a lot of her time here at NOSAMS on the Ramped Pyrolysis and Oxidation (RPO) system.

Her recent work includes the work she did at a guest student at NOSAMS and WHOI,  “Efficient preservation of young terrestrial organic carbon in sandy turbidity-current deposits”

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Jonathan Sanderman’s work on soils using RPO

May 6, 2020

Jon Sanderman visited the lab in 2019 to use the RPO on a series of soil profiles sampled decadally since the 1960’s. Did you know that the RPO was originally called the dirt burner? His paper is now out: Ramped thermal analysis for isolating biologically meaningful soil organic matter fractions with distinct residence times

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