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Amy Speaks with "Science for the Public" on Ocean Circulation

Dr. Bower explains the structure and dynamics of deep ocean currents and the vital role of these currents in maintaining the Earth’s climate. She discusses the concern among climate and ocean scientists about one of the major systems, the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) and the implications of a slowdown in that system. Dr. Bower also describes the technical challenges of measuring systems like the AMOC.

WGBH

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Perkins School for the Blind Visit

Perkins School for the Blind students visit WHOI and members of the Bower Lab as part of an ongoing collaboration to provide outreach to visually impaired students.

In OceanInsight

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WHOI Announces Publication of  Preliminary OSNAP data

Scientists from 16 research institutions collaborate on the first publication of the multi-year Overturning in the Subpolar North Atlantic Program.

WHOI Press Release January 31, 2019

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GRL 2018 Outstanding Reviewer: Viviane Menezes

American Geophysical Union (AGU) Publications recognizes outstanding reviewers for their work in 2018. Honored reviewers were selected by the editors of each AGU journal.

In Eos

by Matt Giampoala, May 2019

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Understanding Gulf Ocean Systems Phase 1 Awardees

National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Research Campaign to Advance Understanding of Gulf of Mexico Loop Current Moves Forward By Awarding $10.3 Million in Initial Grants.

National Academy of Sciences

from the NAS Office of News and Public Information, December 2018

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Deep Floats Reveal Complex Ocean Circulation Patterns

Acoustically tracked floats: What they are, where they go, what they've taught us.  And a new repository to store all that data.

In Eos

by A. Ramsey, H. Furey, A. Bower, November 2018

Hidden Currents in the Gulf of Mexico

Five years after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, RAFOS floats are mapping out the deep currents of the Gulf of Mexico

Bower receives the Chrysalis Award

Center for Vision Loss, Executive Director, Doug Yingling presents Amy Bower with the Chrysalis Award on September 17, 2012.  (Photo by Tom Kleindinst)

In October 2011, the Center for Vision Loss, an agency serving visually impaired people of eastern Pennsylvania, awarded their first-ever "Chrysalis Award" to WHOI scientist Amy Bower. The award, which honors "a blind or visually impaired person who has transformed the world around them," and was given to Amy to recognize her achievements in oceanography and outreach.

OceanInsights for the Blind

WHOI scientist creates a bond with visually impaired students

In Oceanus Magazine

by Kate Madin. Originally published online November 30, 2007

Fieldwork - The Unseen Currents

On the Labrador Sea, the scientific crew of the R/V Knorr hunts for underwater storms, sinks a two-mile mooring,  and gathers clues to the planet's fate.

Popular Science Magazine, March 2011

 

 

Oceanographer tells of lifelong learning

InSouthCoast Today

By Zach Rocha, September 2003